Turkey vultures have returned to Front Range

Some people watch for the first robin of spring. In Capistrano, they look for the return of the swallows. I know it’s spring when the turkey vultures return to the Front Range of Colorado. (https://amylaw.blog/2013/04/08/it-must-be-spring/) Turkey vultures are big birds — the biggest you are likely to see, with the exception of an eagle orContinue reading “Turkey vultures have returned to Front Range”

Birds coming back

We’ve been following the Bald Eagles at Fort St. Vrain power plant closely this spring. But other birds are showing up, too. Spotted Towhees scratch in the soil for insects. But in the spring, you can hear the males calling “tche-tche-tche-cheee!”as they perch on the tips of trees. (https://amylaw.blog/2014/06/02/spotted-towhee/) A pair of black-capped chickadees spentContinue reading “Birds coming back”

Ten days of growth…

Mama eagle shades the chicks. At this point, they are 9 days old. Up until this day, I hadn’t seen them out of the central depression, where the failed egg remains. But once they started exploring, they rambled all over. I’m a little annoyed, because Mama eagle is in the way of a nice shotContinue reading “Ten days of growth…”

Two out of Three

It’s been ten days or so since the first two eagle chicks have hatched. They have grown and become much more active. The third egg, though, is probably not going to hatch. Today, the mother eagle stopped brooding the egg entirely. Even if the last egg did hatch, the chicks get fed on the basisContinue reading “Two out of Three”

Bald Eagle Egg #1, Day 1

The Bald Eagles at the St. Vrain Power Plant in Platteville, Colorado laid their first egg of the season sometime last night or early this morning. When I checked in on them around 10:00 this morning, one of the eagles was sitting in the depression they had carefully created in the nest.https://amylaw.blog/2019/02/10/eagle-cam/ I wasn’t sureContinue reading “Bald Eagle Egg #1, Day 1”

Sharp-shinned hawk misses flicker for lunch

The gregarious band of little bushtits took off in a burst of feathers and cheeping alarm calls. I looked up just in time to see a Northern flicker shoot out of the top of a tree, with a sharp-shinned hawk in hot pursuit. Luckily for the flicker, the hawk had made its move too soon,Continue reading “Sharp-shinned hawk misses flicker for lunch”

A Natural History of Trail Ridge Road Is Now Out

I am delighted to announce that my book, A Natural History of Trail Ridge Road: Rocky Mountain National Park’s Highway to the Sky, is now in bookstores. I’d love to see you at a book signing. Please check this blog frequently for times and places of signings, because they do change. 2:00 May 16, 2015Continue reading “A Natural History of Trail Ridge Road Is Now Out”